Crime Rates Peak in the Summer

homeowners insurance quotesThere were over 98 million property crimes in 2011, including figures for burglary, larceny theft, and motor vehicle theft. Larceny theft involves the successful or attempted taking of property from another; it includes shoplifting, pocket-picking, purse-snatching and bicycle theft. Burglary involves the unlawful entry into a structure such as a home or business. The summer months (June, July, August and September), have the most property crimes, followed by December, according to an FBI analysis based on 2009 data.

PROPERTY CRIME BY MONTH, 2009
 PeriodBurglary (1)Larceny-theftMotor vehicle theftTotal property crime
Jan.-Dec.1,869,7655,397,426709,3847,976,575
Jan.144,227402,01560,146606,388
Feb.118,218354,21650,587523,021
Mar.144,538443,91760,722649,177
Apr.146,333428,09256,047630,472
May.155,944455,83858,937670,719
June.161,702497,58862,468721,758
Jul.170,504487,61362,847720,964
Aug.169,490485,56462,451717,505
Sep.167,788490,61261,079719,479
Oct.163,811458,74658,625681,182
Nov.160,797427,80956,251644,857
Dec.166,413465,41659,224691,053

(1) The States of Alabama, Florida, and Minnesota did not provide monthly breakdowns for offense and are not included in the monthly variation.

Source: U.S. Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation.

BURGLARY BY MONTH, 2009 (1)

BURGLARY BY MONTH, 2009 (1)

(1) The states of Alabama, Florida, and Minnesota did not provide monthly breakdowns for offense and are not included in the monthly variations.

Source: U.S. Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation.

  • There are the greatest number of burglaries in the summer months of July, August, and September, followed by December.

CAMPUS CRIME

Crime is a serious problem for college campuses. There were about 21,000 burglaries on U.S. college campuses in 2011, according to the U.S. Department of Education’s Campus Safety and Security division. The same year there were 3,600 motor vehicle thefts, 1,600 robberies and 640 arson crimes on campus.

CRIME: PROPERTY

The Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Uniform Crime Reports defines property crime as larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft and burglary. These crimes involve the unlawful taking of money or property without the use of force or threat of force against the victims. Larceny theft involves the successful or attempted taking of property from another; it includes shoplifting, pocket-picking, purse-snatching and bicycle theft. While the theft of motor vehicles is a separate offense category, the thefts of motor vehicle parts and accessories are considered larceny. Burglary involves the unlawful entry into a structure such as a home or business. The burglary rate for renters was about 50 percent higher for renters than owners from 2003 to 2007, according to a 2010 Bureau of Justice Statistics report. Home burglaries accounted for 74 percent of burglary offenses in 2010, according to the FBI. According to a 2010 Bureau of Justice Statistics special report, the risk of burglary was higher for renters than for owners whether or not someone was home, based on 2003-2007 data. The report is posted on the Web at http://bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/content/pub/pdf/vdhb.pdf.

NUMBER AND RATE OF PROPERTY CRIME OFFENSES IN THE UNITED STATES, 2002-2011 (1)
BurglaryLarceny-theft
YearNumberRateNumberRate
20022,151,252747.07,057,3792,450.7
20032,154,834741.07,026,8022,416.5
20042,144,446730.36,937,0892,362.3
20052,155,448726.96,783,4472,287.8
20062,194,993733.16,626,3632,213.2
20072,190,198726.16,591,5422,185.4
20082,228,887733.06,586,2062,166.1
20092,203,313717.76,338,0952,064.5
20102,168,459701.06,204,6012,005.8
20112,188,005702.26,159,7951,976.9
Motor vehicle theftTotal property crime (2)
YearNumberRateNumberRate
20021,246,646432.910,455,2773,630.6
20031,261,226433.710,442,8623,591.2
20041,237,851421.510,319,3863,514.1
20051,235,859416.810,174,7543,431.5
20061,198,245400.210,019,6013,346.6
20071,100,472364.99,882,2123,276.4
2008959,059315.49,774,1523,214.6
2009795,652259.29,337,0603,041.3
2010739,565239.19,112,6252,945.9
2011715,373229.69,063,1732,908.7

(1) Rate is per 100,000 inhabitants.
(2) Property crimes are the offenses of burglary, larceny-theft and motor vehicle theft.

Source: U.S. Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Uniform Crime Reports.

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TOP TEN U.S. METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS BY MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT RATE, 2012
RankMetropolitan Statistical Area (1)Vehicles stolenRate (2)
1Modesto, CA4,260816.52
2Fresno, CA7,563797.87
3Bakersfield, CA6,797793.90
4Stockton-Lodi, CA4,940703.09
5Yakima, WA1,665674.15
6San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA28,220633.37
7San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA11,810623.42
8Vallejo-Fairfield, CA2,615621.50
9Spokane-Spokane Valley, WA3,025568.34
10Redding, CA938525.24

(1) Metropolitan statistical areas are designated by the federal Office of Management and Budget and usually include areas much larger than the cities for which they are named.
(2) Rate of vehicle thefts reported per 100,000 people based on the 2012 U.S. Census Population Estimates.

Source: National Insurance Crime Bureau.

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TOP TEN MOST FREQUENTLY STOLEN PASSENGER VEHICLES, 2012
RankModel (1)Thefts
1Honda Accord58,596
2Honda Civic47,037
3Ford Pickup (Full size)26,770
4Chevrolet Pickup (Full size)23,745
5Toyota Camry16,251
6Dodge Caravan11,799
7Dodge Pickup (Full size)11,755
8Acura Integra9,555
9Nissan Altima9,169
10Nissan Maxima6,947

(1) Includes all model years for each vehicle.

Source: National Insurance Crime Bureau.

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ARSON

Arson, the act of deliberately setting fire to a building, car or other property for fraudulent or malicious purposes, is a crime in all states.

Arson, the act of deliberately setting fire to a building, car or other property for fraudulent or malicious purposes, is a crime in all states.

Church arsons, a major problem in the 1980s, have dropped significantly. Intentional fires in religious and funeral properties fell 82 percent from 1,320 in 1980 to 240 in 2002, the last time such figures were tracked. Structural fires in houses of worship caused $102 million in property damage from 2004-2008, according to the National Fire Protection Association.

INTENTIONALLY SET FIRES, 2002-2011
StructuresVehicles
YearNumber of firesProperty loss
($ millions) (1)
Number of firesProperty loss
($ millions)
200244,500$91941,000$222
200337,50069230,500132
200436,50071436,000165
200531,50066421,000113
200631,10075520,500134
200732,50073320,500145
200830,50086617,500139
200926,50068415,000108
201027,50058514,00089
201126,50060114,00088

(1) Includes overall direct property loss to contents, structures, vehicles, machinery, vegetation or any other property involved in a fire. Does not include indirect losses, such as business interruption or temporary shelter costs.

Source: National Fire Protection Association.

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